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Randoald Sabbe

°1973

Randoald has a well-earned reputation as a graphic designer who combines his many years of experience gained in his independent art work practices, with an intuitive study and creation of images relating to the conception of visual design and imagination. Concepts such as time perception, originality and attribution, re-usability, interpretation and copyright are reconsidered and reinterpreted. He observes the material world with a disarming approach, and by doing so brings familiar elements together to create new visual concepts
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Give us a pictogram and we are no longer lost.

These pictographs form a unique, straight line with the cave paintings at Lascaux and have been copied, disseminated and useful simultaneously thousands of times and for hundreds of years. As signs of fertility and protection. As an example of copulation and genitalia. As an abstraction of the plowed field. No world where death and life are as connected as those on a farm. Where the need to put one above the other is so great. So great that man needs the magic of these ancient symbols. On fences, gates and walls. Rusted, bent and chipped. Forgotten, stripped and abused. 'A symbol is a reality, coinciding with another and visibly representing it'.

In Randoald Sabbe's work, history, politics, religion, semantics and its impermanence always come to the fore. For him, nothing is what it appears to be at first glance, but at the same time it is. He feels the constant urge to refresh our memory and ensure that nothing is lost.
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Evolution directs “Ora et Labora” to “Play and Work. Play with tools meant to work leads to this work that generates new meanings. When we want to perform a task, we look for an extension of our hands. In Randoald Sabbe's performance, the practical aspect becomes increasingly secondary to reflection on the tools themselves. The tools become abstract concepts that form constructs to interpret reality. The sense of familiarity fades. The tools transform into mental instruments, no longer practical tools.

A shovel becomes a symbolic act, a kick in the air, used to dig for the sky, but ultimately only resulting in emptiness. Putting the shovel into the ground becomes only a step up, a symbolic act without concrete impact.
Thoughts float, a moment of pause leads to a pose.
References, such as the symbols of gambling, devil, pitchfork, trident, and the written-out number 666 are part of a figure taking shape.
Is it a sweeping sign when a brush wants out? Times change.

In Randoald Sabbe's work, history, politics, religion, semantics and its impermanence keep coming up. For him, nothing is what it appears to be at first glance, but at the same time it is. He feels the constant urge to refresh our memory and ensure that nothing is lost.

Artworks

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